Basilica was built by Pope Symmachus (498–514), on this place where the body of young martyr Saint Pancras of Rome, had been buried, Via Aurelia miliario secundo ('on the Via Aurelia at the second milestone'). The church was originally placed under the care of the Church of S. Crisogono. Due to their neglect of the site, Pope Gregory I ((590–604) handed it over to the members of the newly founded Benedictine Order, after this the Lombards sacked their monastery in 580. In the seventh century Pope Honorius I (625–638) built a larger church and increased numbers of pilgrims. He placed the relics of the saint beneath the high altar with a window of access from a semi-circular corridor that led behind the altar. It was given to the Discalced Carmelites In the 17th century, who completely remodeled it. The church underwent further rebuilding in the 19th century, it has been heavily damaged during Garibaldi's attack on Rome in 1849, but it retains its plain brick facade of the late 15th century.

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02 March 2019

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Chiesa di San Pancrazio

Basilica was built by Pope Symmachus (498–514), on this place where the body of young martyr Saint Pancras of Rome, had been buried, Via Aurelia miliario secundo (‘on the Via Aurelia at the second milestone’). The church was originally placed under the care of the Church of S. Crisogono. Due to their neglect of the site, Pope Gregory I ((590–604) handed it over to the members of the newly founded Benedictine Order, after this the Lombards sacked their monastery in 580. In the seventh century Pope Honorius I (625–638) built a larger church and increased numbers of pilgrims. He placed the relics of the saint beneath the high altar with a window of access from a semi-circular corridor that led behind the altar. It was given to the Discalced Carmelites In the 17th century, who completely remodeled it. The church underwent further rebuilding in the 19th century, it has been heavily damaged during Garibaldi’s attack on Rome in 1849, but it retains its plain brick facade of the late 15th century.